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  5. 4-General Rules
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  13. 12-Subdivision Services & Infrastructure
    1. 12A-Purpose: Subdivision
    2. 12B-Subdivision in Residential Zones
    3. 12C-Subdivision in the Rural Residential Zone
    4. 12D-Subdivision in the Rural Zones
    5. 12E-Subdivision in Commercial & Industrial Zones
    6. 12F-Subdivision: Marae, Papakainga & Matapihi
    7. 12G-Purpose: Service & Infrastructure
  14. 13-Open Space
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  16. 15-Rural Residential Zone
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  21. 20-Special Use Zone-Baypark
  22. Part B Maps
Tauranga City Plan

5A.3  Objectives and Policies for the Natural Environment

Updated 9 September 2013

5A.3.1 Objective - Protection of Special Ecological Areas (Category 1)

The factors, values and associations of the City's Category 1 Special Ecological Areas are identified and protected.

5A.3.1.1 Policy - Identifying Special Ecological Areas

By identifying Special Ecological Areas and their factors, values and associations by the extent that the following criteria are met:

  1. Representativeness. The primary criterion, based on a comparison of present vegetation cover versus past extent, diversity and pattern, naturalness, and size;
  2. Diversity and pattern. The diversity of ecological and physical features, and the patterns that exist within an area under consideration;
  3. Naturalness. The degree to which the vegetation and habitats reflect likely natural character;
  4. Size and shape. Relatively large areas (for example, compared to the mean size of remaining areas of indigenous vegetation in an Ecological District) are preferred as small areas can be affected strongly by edge effects. A compact single area is generally preferable to long narrow areas or small separate remnants;
  5. Rarity and special features. The relative rarity of physical landscape features, vegetation, habitats and species within an ecological region or district or on a national basis;
  6. Buffering and connectivity. The degree to which a natural area is protected or buffered by the surrounding landscape, or provides a buffer to other areas. An area may play an important role by connecting other areas of indigenous flora and fauna or providing a riparian buffer;
  7. Viability. The likelihood of an area remaining ecologically viable over time. Larger areas are generally more likely to remain viable with lower levels of management input.

5A.3.1.2 Policy - Protection of Special Ecological Areas (Category 1)

By protecting the particular factors, values and associations that make an area a Special Ecological Area (Category 1) from the adverse effects of subdivision, use and development, by having regard to:

  1. The importance of the area to indigenous fauna (locally and regionally);
  2. The degree to which there has been cumulative loss of the extent and species diversity of this type of ecosystem;
  3. The rarity of the ecosystem or community of plant species;
  4. The presence of threatened species;
  5. The presence of species at their distributional limits;
  6. The duration and frequency of effect (for example, long-term or recurring effects);
  7. The irreversibility of effect (for example, loss of unique or rare flora or fauna, limited opportunity for remediation, the costs and technical feasibility of remediation or mitigation);
  8. The opportunities to remedy or mitigate pre-existing or potential adverse effects (for example, ecological restoration or enhancement), where avoidance is not practicable;
  9. The probability of effect (for example, likelihood of unforeseen effects, ability to take a precautionary approach);
  10. Cumulative effects (for example loss of multiple features, factors, values or associations);
  11. Need for, or purpose of, the works;
  12. The provision of public amenity, and access to land acquired by Council for reserve purposes.

5A.3.1.3 Policy - Subdivision, Use & Development Adjoining Special Ecological Areas (Category 1)

By ensuring that subdivision, use and development adjoining any Category 1 Special Ecological Area does not adversely affect the factors, values and associations of that area, by having regard to the matters outlined in Policy 5A.3.1.2 Policy - Protection of Special Ecological Areas (Category 1).

5A.3.2 Objective - Maintenance & Enhancement of Special Ecological Areas (Category 2)

The factors, values and associations of the City's Category 2 Special Ecological Areas are maintained and enhanced.

5A.3.2.1 Policy - Identifying Special Ecological Areas (Category 2)

By identifying and assessing Special Ecological Areas (Category 2) by the degree to which they contain factors, values and associations listed in 5A.3.1.1 Policy - Identifying Special Ecological Areas.

5A.3.2.2 Policy - Maintaining & Enhancing Special Ecological Areas (Category 2)

By maintaining and enhancing the particular factors, values and associations that make an area a Special Ecological Area (Category 2), from the adverse effects of inappropriate subdivision, use and development, by having regard to:

  1. The character and degree of modification, damage, loss or destruction that will result from the activity;
  2. The duration and frequency of effect (for example long-term or recurring effects);
  3. The magnitude or scale of effect (for example number of sites affected, spatial distribution, landscape context);
  4. Cumulative effects (for example loss of multiple features or values);
  5. Need for, or purpose of, the works;
  6. The provision of public amenity and access to land acquired by Council for reserve purposes.

5A.3.3 Objective - Maintenance and Enhancement of Areas of Indigenous Vegetation

The factors, values and associations of areas of indigenous vegetation, not identified as a special ecological area, continue to contribute to the intrinsic values of ecosystems and/or the maintenance and enhancement of the City's amenity values.

5A.3.3.1 Policy - Identifying Areas of Indigenous Vegetation

By identifying and assessing areas of indigenous vegetation, not identified as a special ecological area, by the degree to which they contain factors, values and associations listed in 5A.3.1.1 Policy - Identifying Special Ecological Areas.

5A.3.3.2 Policy - Maintaining & Enhancing Areas of Indigenous Vegetation

By maintaining and enhancing the particular factors, values and associations of areas of indigenous vegetation, not identified as a special ecological area, from the adverse effects of inappropriate subdivision, use and development by having regard to:

  1. The area's contribution to the intrinsic value of ecosystems within the City;
  2. The area's contribution to the maintenance and enhancement of amenity values of the City.

5A.3.4 Objective - Management of Access to and Within Special Ecological Areas

Public access is provided to and within Special Ecological Areas that are in public ownership or control.

5A.3.4.1 Policy - Management of Access to and Within Special Ecological Areas

By providing for public access, and associated recreational facilities to and within Special Ecological Areas that are in public ownership or control, where that access does not adversely affect the health, viability or factors, values and associations of that area.

5A.3.5 Objective - Maintenance of Existing Network Utilities

The maintenance and minor upgrading (in relation to electric lines) of existing network utilities within and adjoining Special Ecological Areas is provided for.

5A.3.5.1 Policy - Maintenance of Existing Network Utilities

By providing for the maintenance and minor upgrading (in relation to electric lines) of existing network utilities within and adjoining Special Ecological Areas where that maintenance and minor upgrading (in relation to electric lines) does not adversely affect the health, viability or factors, values and associations of that area.

5A.3.6 Objective - Reduction of Habitat Fragmentation and Isolation

Habitat fragmentation and isolation of natural areas throughout the City is reduced.

5A.3.6.1 Policy - Reduction of Habitat Fragmentation and Isolation

By ensuring subdivision, use and development provides for the maintenance and enhancement of areas of remnant indigenous vegetation, including any Special Ecological Area, where their provision is likely to:

  1. Improve the natural character of the coastal environment, wetlands, rivers and streams;
  2. Improve the viability of a habitat or its dependant fauna;
  3. Maintain or enhance the health, viability or factors, values and associations of those areas;
  4. Reduce habitat fragmentation and isolation of identified Special Ecological Areas;
  5. Restore areas where ecological values can be enhanced.

5A.3.6.2 Policy - Migration of Natural Features

By recognising that natural features may migrate inland as a result of dynamic coastal and harbour processes and climate change, and to take account of this in providing for the preservation of natural character when subdivision, use or development in the coastal environment is being assessed.


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